Knowing You’re Too Good For Your Job, and Why That’s Okay

*Warning* This is going to be one of those rare times where I’m going to be SUPER preachy and cheesy. This has been rolling around in my head and needed to get it out.

“What am I doing with my life?”

“I’ve been here for years and still feel like I give more to my damn job than I get in return.”

“I never feel challenged anymore”

“I have all of these skills that I don’t get to use or get paid for! Aaaaaaarrrrgh!!!”

If you’ve ever had any of these thoughts, you’re probably too good for your job, and if you already knew this, I hope you also already know it’s something that is okay to acknowledge about yourself. However, if not:

As long as you aren’t an asshole about it to your coworkers, it doesn’t make you an arrogant prick to acknowledge you are wasting your time with your everyday nine-to-five job. I work with a few wonderful, hard-working people that I know could do so much more with their lives, but for whatever reasons, personal or financial, much like myself, are stuck in the rut of work that is less than satisfying. What is the main thing all these folk have in common? A strong work ethic.

Let me make this ubundantly clear, you could yell to me from the top of your stack of little soapboxes until you’re blue in the face that you are too good for your job. However, if you don’t do the job you currently have with urgency, aren’t reliable, refuse to push yourself, and complain about doing even the simplest of tasks, how do you expect anyone to believe that you deserve a satisfying, higher paying, honest to dog career? In the context of the workplace, you could be the nicest person on the planet, but if you are a lazy worker, the hardworking folk on your crew aren’t going to respect you, like you, or listen to you. 

Anyway, tangent aside, as it stands, the people I know for a fact are better than their job are those that are exhausted, sore, under-appreciated, pay their dues, yet still they suck it up, roll out of bed, and clock in for another day at the “salt mines”.

If that is you, and you for whatever reason feel that a humble person wouldn’t admit such things to themselves, take comfort in the fact that in this case, you’re wrong. You exist as part of a sadly dwindling group of people, don’t ask me what happened, because I haven’t the slightest idea, but I can’t tell you how many kids I see losing their jobs because they don’t know how to take pride in a hard night’s work, and they still expect to be making $100k a year by twenty-five. 

So please, admit this one thing to yourself, and if you have no way at the moment to make that real career of which you know you deserve happen, at least sit down and see if you can make it happen in your near future. I’ll be sitting right next to you on that boat, setting sail for a better future.

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “Knowing You’re Too Good For Your Job, and Why That’s Okay

  1. I worked in retail for almost 15 years because it allowed me to work on a flexible schedule which I needed. I got paid the minimum wage , and believe me, I thought that I was capable of better jobs. I ALWAYS had a good work ethic though and worked hard. I get exactly where you’re coming from on this,

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Just landed my first permanent job as an office junior at the age of 24 and I’m still learning this! You take what you get and don’t get upset, but it’s still important to keep in mind that nobody ever really knows what they will achieve in the next 2, 5, 10 years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Congratulations on the job! And yes, that is quite true, the future is a mystery, focusing on what you can do in the present to work toward what future you want is all one can ever do.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s